Archive for the ‘Road Trip’ Category

Even though the movie has a lot of flaws, especially in its storytelling, you do keep watching until the end. The acting is great. And the direction is good. But it’s the road trip itself that fascinates the most. You hardly ever see movies that take place in rural Brazil. It’s always Rio or Sao Paulo. Or Recife. Or Salvador. But this time around, most scenes are shot outside of the cities.

The story focuses on the search of a father (an excellent Wagner Moura) for his son, who left the house after an argument with both parents and is missing. He apparently bought a horse and took it up north. Along the way, the father – a wealthy doctor – is confronted with himself, the feelings for his family members and the state in which other – less privileged – Brazilians live.


Movie night with my mom (83). Her choice: The Leisure Seeker, a story about an older couple who, after being married for 50 years, decide to go on a road trip from their home in Massachusetts to the house of Ernest Hemingway in Key West. Both are in no condition to go on such a long trip as mr Spencer has Alzheimer’s and mrs Spencer is diagnosed with a terminal disease. Yet, off they are!

My mom liked the movie and loved the performances of Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland.

Personally, I thought the acting was not exciting at all. Helen Mirren is good, sure. But she’s always good. Donald Sutherland acted too much like a whimsical, confused ten-year old. That Alzheimer patients are confused, sure. And whimsical as well. Hey, the childlike behavior happens too. But it was just too much. But all the other members of the cast are acting ridiculously. Like the bunch of Trump supporters that were given the task to shout USA and look angry. It’s not even funny. Or the two guys who try to rob the couple along the highway. If that was a casting audition they’d never get another casting call.

But it’s the story that makes this movie a big disappointment. Not the general concept. The idea of a couple who have been married going on a road trip to reflect on their life is good. But to add the diseases to it is just too much. Maybe if mrs Spencer would have driven the mobile home, it would have made sense. But the storytellers preferred to have the Alzheimer patient drive the entire stretch. They depict him as not knowing this and that, yet driving a mobile home works just fine.  I’ve seen Alzheimer patients who didn’t know the name of their husbands, but were still able to play piano flawlessly. So, I get it, driving a vehicle is something you never forget. But that’s bull. It’s totally irresponsible to have a guy like Mr Spencer drive that long stretch. And not credible. That he can still quote dialogue from his favorite books, okay. But that he drives the entire stretch? no.

That said. Some moments are funny. And it’s kind of adventurous what they do. And there are a few surprises (for my mom). In her words: “It’s a movie for old people, young people probably won’t like it”.


This series is great !

Two awkward kids (check the trailer) hang out and go on a Bonny & Clyde like adventurous road trip! They are wild and just don’t give a sh*t. But they are still kids, yearning to be loved. By each other, but also by others.

It’s a fun series. The humor is dark. Pitch-dark. Marlon Wayans: watch this and cry. THIS is humor. Up until the last scene, the series keeps you intrigued. Not only by these two protagonists or their runaway story, but by all the other characters that you get to meet. It’s like each one of them can have a spin-off series. It’s quite a 2017 series. In a positive way. I hope there’s no sequel to it. It ends the way a series should end.

Watch it!

Captain Fantastic – ***

Posted: November 27, 2016 in 2016, Drama, Family Feud, Road Trip, USA, XXX

Somewhere in a forest in Oregon lives a dad with his six kids. He trains them to survive on their own in nature, killing wild animals, climbing steep rocks and reading very difficult books (sic). Their mom isn’t there, because she’s in the hospital, out there in the ‘real world’.

Then the moment comes when the family learns that their mom has died and will get a typical christian funeral and burial, which is contrary to her buddhist believes. So the whole family goes on a road trip to stop this from happening!

Yes. There are a lot of things in the story that don’t make sense. But it’s a fictional story, so you just need to soak it up and enjoy it like some weird fairytale without a morale. It’s a quirky, strange, bizarre, but lovely tale about a family trying to hold onto something that they know will disappear one day.

Some of the father’s principles are really praiseworthy. But some are just hypocrite. Luckily, the performance of Viggo Mortensen makes you like the character, even at his most unreasonable moments. The road trip makes you want to book a trip to the US yourself. There’s drama, but also humor. A perfect balance.

Too bad the movie takes a different direction just when it becomes really interesting. They finally make it to the real world, but that confrontation is not played out enough. Kind of disappointing if that’s what you’re expecting after having seen the trailer.

Still. Good movie.

Theeb – ***

Posted: October 7, 2016 in 2014, Adventure, Coming Of Age, Drama, Jordan, Road Trip, UK, XXX

It’s not really difficult to define what makes a movie great. When you watch a story on screen that entertains/fascinates/thrills you from start to finish, then it’s a great movie. Period.

Such is the case with this gem from Jordan.

A young bedouin follows his older brother, who is assigned to escort an English army officer through the dessert. At one point he finds him self alone in the vast emptiness…

This is a very entertaining road movie/adventure film/historical piece/coming of age story with a fascinating cinematography and several suspenseful thrills. It makes you want to watch Lawrence Of Arabia again or look up flight tickets to Aqaba to go tracking in the Wadi Rum.

A must. And if you have kids who can deal with death, an excellent movie for children as well.

Indians can make great feel good movies. They are overlong and overdramatic, but they are able to charm in an old fashioned kind of way.

At the centre of this movie is a 6-year old adventurous girl from Pakistan who gets separated from her mother after a hospital visit in Dehli. Since she is mute, she cannot communicate well in the ’foreign’ land and needs the help of others to return to her homeland.

A sincere, but naive and somewhat dumb Hindu muscleman, takes care of the girl and wants to get her back to her parents. He has the support of his love interest, but not of the latter’s father who is furious when he learns the girl is Muslim and Pakistani.

The first part of the movie isn’t all that special, but once our hero gets into Pakistan illegally, the story and journey become a great modern fairytale. He is considered a spy by the authorities and needs to run from them, but he does get help from the locals and from a news reporter.

Of course the acting is more comical than dramatic and yes there are several musical scenes (it’s Bollywood after all), but in the end it’s a great family movie that shows that love should conquer hatred. Not sure why these movies don’t get a wide release in the west.

Chef – *(*)

Posted: March 1, 2015 in 2014, Dramedy, Road Trip, USA, X1/2

Chef is a light comedy by Jon Favreau, known as the director of the successful Iron Man series. It feels like a low budget indie flic, made by a graduating student from a movie making masterclass. But it has some big names in the cast: Robert Downey Jr and Scarlet Johansson. They only play minor parts, but still. They draw the attention and an audience that normally would never bother watching a movie like this.

The main story is about a chef of a popular restaurant who’s confined to making the same menu over and over again. When a notorious food critic gives him bad press, he feels hurt and decides to leave the restaurant in search of new creativity. He leaves LA for Miami, opens up a food truck and drives across the US in the company of a good friend and his son, with whom he has a troubled relationship.

It’s interesting material for a great movie about father/dad issues, the internal struggle to find the balance between creativity and money making and great shots of food making. However, somehow it fails to deliver. The father/dad issue isn’t all that dramatic; the internal struggle is pretty superficial and the shots of food do not make you hungry at all.

 Chef is the kind of movie that you’ve already forgotten about twenty minutes after having finished it. There isn’t anything remarkable about it at all. It does have its merits though as a document about the importance of social media anno 2014. The dispute with the food critic goes viral and the young kid uses Twitter, Facebook, Youtube and Vine to promote his father’s food truck. Now how will that look when you re-watch it in 2034?

Jon Favreau probably hates movie critics and just gets back at them by making a movie about food critics.That’s okay. And he has a point. Why should a critic slam a product in which a lot of love and effort was put? But then again, if it’s unremarkable it’s unremarkable.